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VPHA News

  • 31 Jul 2014 8:36 AM | Anonymous

    U.S. Senator Tim Kaine met with White House Drug Policy Acting Director Michael Botticelli to discuss the opioid crisis in Virginia and next steps to combat the epidemic. Last month, Kaine praised Botticelli’s announcement in Roanoke that the Administration plans to direct $25.5 billion toward public health and criminal justice initiatives that will help tackle rapidly growing rates of prescription painkiller and heroin abuse across the country. (Augusta Free Press) Read more...

  • 30 Jul 2014 2:38 PM | Anonymous

    How much are you willing to work out in order to dine out? That’s the tongue-in-cheek question posed by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a watchdog group that released its latest list of high-calorie, high-fat, high-sodium and high-sugar meals served at chain restaurants. CSPI reviews menu and nutritional information for more than 200 of the top U.S. chain restaurants “and we just look for the worst items that we can find,” said Paige Einstein, registered dietitian with CSPI. This year’s “Xtreme Eating Awards,” the group’s sixth such compilation, come as some restaurants have started to list calorie contents for their items on their menus or online. (Chicago Tribune)

  • 30 Jul 2014 2:37 PM | Anonymous

    Get this: Rosa DeLauro, the brave and beloved 12-term congresswoman from New Haven, will be introducing a bill in the House of Representatives Wednesday that would require a national tax on sugar-sweetened beverages. And it’s about time. You know the big picture, even if you’ve forgotten the details, so I’m going to spare you the stats about obesity and diabetes that have been reiterated here and elsewhere ad infinitum. (If you want a refresher course, see this.) Suffice it to say that sugar-sweetened beverages are linked to obesity and diabetes, and that some form of control is needed.

    With coalition-building (the American Public Health Association and the Center for Science in the Public Interest, among others, are supporting the SWEET Act), education and continuing research and revelations about the damage wrought by high sugar consumption, we should see increased support for regulation of the marketing and sales of what’s sometimes called “liquid candy.” (New York Times)

  • 30 Jul 2014 2:35 PM | Anonymous

    This week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is hosting public hearings for its Clean Power Plan, which proposed the first-ever nationwide carbon emissions limits for existing power plants. More than 1,500 people were scheduled to testify in Atlanta, Denver, Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., to debate the rule, which is under a 120-day comment period after its June 2 announcement.

    After its release, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy announced that by 2030 the plan would reduce carbon pollution by 30 percent and smog and soot by 25 percent. (public health newswire)

  • 30 Jul 2014 2:29 PM | Anonymous

    Those of you tanning or burning your skin this summer should stop undefined seek the shade, wear a hat and some sunscreen and, whatever you do, stay out of indoor tanning salons. It’s a familiar skin-cancer prevention message, but it’s coming from a new source: the office of the U.S. Surgeon General.

    The call to action from acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak, released Tuesday, says that skin cancer is a “major public health problem” and that too much exposure to indoor and outdoor ultraviolet light is a major cause. It comes just two months after the Food and Drug Administration announced it will soon require labels on tanning beds and lamps warning against use by anyone younger than 18. (USA Today)

  • 30 Jul 2014 2:28 PM | Anonymous

    Ebola, the killer of more than 670 people in four West African countries since February, has spread beyond Africa only once. That doesn’t mean it can’t happen now, infectious disease experts warn. 

    The symptoms appear from two days to three weeks after infection, meaning it’s possible for an infected person who doesn’t feel ill to board a plane, said Ben Neuman, a virologist at the University of Reading in the U.K. Since Ebola in its earliest stages can resemble nothing more than flu, no one else would know either, he said. (Bloomberg)

    Ebola, the killer of more than 670 people in four West African countries since February, has spread beyond Africa only once. That doesn’t mean it can’t happen now, infectious disease experts warn.
    The symptoms appear from two days to three weeks after infection, meaning it’s possible for an infected person who doesn’t feel ill to board a plane, said Ben Neuman, a virologist at the University of Reading in the U.K. Since Ebola in its earliest stages can resemble nothing more than flu, no one else would know either, he said.
  • 01 Jun 2014 11:24 AM | Anonymous

    Addiction and trauma compromise quality of life for members of the U.S. Armed Forces, veterans, and their families: drug or alcohol use was involved in 30 percent of the Army’s suicide deaths from 2003 to 2009 and in more than 45 percent of non-fatal suicide attempts from 2005-2009.

    Join Sandra Rasmussen, PhD, RN, LMHC, CAS-F, author of AJN's Distinguished Book of the Year Addiction Treatment: Theory and Practice at Health on the Homefront June 16-17 to discuss a management model health professionals can use to help these men and women improve their health and increase quality of life. Rasmussen is currently an addiction therapist at Williamsville Wellness in Hanover County and teaches graduate students in psychology and public health at Walden University and in counseling psychology at the Chesapeake campus of Cambridge College. She was recognized by the Virginia Public Health Association in 2004 for her “outstanding leadership, commitment and support to the public health of Virginia” and in 2012 received Fellow Status from the American Academy Health Care Providers in the Addictive Disorders.

    Click here for complete details on Health on the Homefront, and be sure to like the event on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @VPHAHomefront. 

  • 31 May 2014 5:37 PM | Anonymous

    Dr. Cynthia Romero, MD, former Virginia Health Commissioner and a past-president of the Medical Society of Virginia, will be joining us at Health on the Homefront on June 16-17 for a session titled “Special Considerations for Clinicians Serving Members of the Military and Their Families.” With her background in family practice in the Hampton Roads region and her term as Chief Medical Officer and Vice President for Quality and Medical Affairs at Chesapeake Regional Medical Center, Dr. Romero has extensive experience serving the needs of military families and has directly dealt with many of the issues they face.

    She has been a strong advocate for her patients and for the medical profession through her leadership roles in multiple professional medical organizations. Dr. Romero has served as President of the Philippine Medical Association of Southeastern Virginia, Inc., the Tidewater Academy of Family Physicians, the Virginia Academy of Family Physicians, the Norfolk Academy of Medicine and, in 2011, she was the President of the Medical Society of Virginia. Her leadership continued during her term as Virginia’s Health Commissioner from January, 2013 through January, 2014. She has been recognized with the Mead Johnson Award by the American Academy of Family Physicians for excellence in clinical medicine and community services. 

    Dr. Romero was recently appointed Director of EVMS' M. Foscue Brock Institute for Community and Global Health, founded in 2012 to focus on training the next generation of community-minded health professionals. In September 2013 she spoke at UVA's Medical Center Hour on Creating Healthy Communities - check it out here.

    Click here for complete details on Health on the Homefront, and be sure to like the event on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @VPHAHomefront. 

  • 28 May 2014 4:45 PM | Anonymous

    At our upcoming conference on June 16-17 in Hampton, entitled Health on the Homefront, the Virginia Public Health Association is honored to welcome Dr. Jan Kemp, RN, PhD as one of our keynote speakers!

    Dr. Kemp, a co-author of the 2012 Suicide in the Military Report, is the National Mental Health Program Director for Suicide Prevention and Community Engagement with the Department of Veterans Affairs Mental Health Services. In 2009, Dr. Kemp was a White House Appointee to the Department of Defense Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces and in 2010 served on the Army Suicide Prevention Task Force. Major honors include the VA Secretary’s Exceptional Service Award in 2007, and she was the Service to America Federal Employee of the Year in 2009. She was featured on “Huffpost Live” speaking about suicide prevention in September.

    In her presentation “Veteran Suicide Prevention Strategies,” Dr. Kemp will discuss how communities can provide ongoing support and assistance to Veterans and their families. Gain an overview of current Veteran suicide statistics and data, and review current programs in the VA to work with Veterans and their families. Participants will understand the potential mental health needs of Veterans, appreciate the importance of community based approaches to suicide prevention, and know how to get a Veteran help in a crisis.

    Click here for complete details on Health on the Homefront, and be sure to like the event on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @VPHAHomefront. 

  • 28 May 2014 2:59 PM | Anonymous

    At our upcoming conference on June 16-17 in Hampton, entitled Health on the Homefront, the Virginia Public Health Association will be deeply honored to welcome Retired Major General Mark Graham and Mrs. Carol Graham (pictured at right) as our keynote speakers. Their presentation, Our Sons Died Fighting Different Battles: One Family’s Story, will address the stigma surrounding mental health, raise awareness of the warning signs and risk factors for suicide, and discuss real life coping strategies. In a speech at Fort Knox in 2009, Major General Graham stated, “From our personal tragedies, my wife Carol and our daughter Melanie and I have come to realize that in order to survive, we had to use our brokenness to reach out and openly share our story and try to give hope to others…As an Army and as a nation, we must get in front of suicide, work to prevent it by action, not just figure it out after the fact…We have pledged to use Kevin’s death to raise awareness in the military to the dangers of untreated depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries, and other mental health issues.” (Rose, M. (2009, Winter). Major General Mark Graham: A legacy of hope. T.A.P.S. Magazine, 15(4).)

    In 2003 the Grahams’ son Kevin, a senior ROTC cadet at the University of Kentucky, died by suicide in the apartment he shared with his two siblings. Seven months after Kevin’s death, his brother - the Grahams’ eldest son - 2nd Lt. Jeffrey Graham, was killed in Iraq by an improvised explosive devise (IED). Jeffrey died with Kevin’s driver’s license in his pocket. Since that time, Major General Graham and his wife, Carol, have been tireless champions of military and civilian efforts to promote mental health and suicide-prevention awareness, and to eliminate the stigma surrounding mental health care. Their personal tragedy and dedication to honoring their sons (both pictured at left) have been widely documented in the media

    Major General Mark Graham has had a distinguished thirty-five year career with the military, retiring from the US Army in 2012. His final position was as the Director, U.S. Army Forces Command, where he oversaw the plans, operations and training for Army forces stationed in the Continental United States and ensured conventional forces were prepared for worldwide deployment and combat.  Major General Graham’s numerous military awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Bronze Star Medal, the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal and the Humanitarian Service Medal.

    Mrs. Carol Graham is nationally recognized for her efforts in suicide prevention and mental health. She has received numerous awards and other recognition including the President of the United States ‘Call to Service’ Award, Governor’s Commendation (State of Oklahoma) for Suicide Prevention and Depression Awareness; the Texas Governor’s “Yellow Rose of Texas” award; US Army Forces Command’s Commander’s Award; US Forces Command Well Being Award; Secretary of the Army Public Service Award; the 2009 Suicide Prevention Advocacy Recognition in Kentucky (SPARK) Award; and the Shining Lights of Hope Award of the Carson J. Spencer Foundation.

    Click here for complete details on Health on the Homefront, and be sure to like the event on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @VPHAHomefront.

     

     

     

     


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